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Dorr trustee candidates discuss new building use

Published: Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2013 5:30 a.m. CDT

WOODSTOCK – A few months after the completion of major projects to upgrade the town hall and road district facilities, Dorr Township trustee candidates say they’ll now focus on making the most of their new buildings.

Incumbents Mark Andersen, Chris Cantwell, Joseph Evanoff and Jon Sheahan will face newcomer John Fuller to fill four spots in the Republican primary Tuesday. Dorr Township covers portions of Woodstock, Crystal Lake, Bull Valley and Lakewood.

The elected board will be tasked with “continuing to add additional services to the township and to the community,” and finding “better use of the expanded facility,” said Cantwell, who was appointed to the board in December 2011.

“It’s going to cost us more money to operate both of those facilities,” said Sheahan, a March appointee. “I think it will be that – operating under budget – and then also trying to enhance some of the programs we have for senior citizens, now that we have space to do those sorts of things.”

Construction was completed late last fall on new road district facilities to better store and wash the district’s five trucks, as well as mix and store salt brine solution.

A project in the works for about a decade came to fruition last year when Dorr Township moved into a new, 10,800-square-foot town hall building, replacing the 1,600-square-foot building the township called home for 35 years.

The new town hall also houses the Woodstock Food Pantry, and includes a boardroom, a community room and meeting rooms.

Evanoff, an incumbent candidate seeking his fourth term, said the new board will have to figure out how to best use that space to provide revenue for the township and services to the community.

He also cited a desire to continue helping the Woodstock Food Pantry, which has welcomed the larger space.

“It’s just a matter of keeping it going and building it up,” Evanoff said. Trustees have been volunteering their time toward the pantry, he added.

Andersen, a 10-year veteran of the board, agreed that the main task in the coming year would be to “adjust and balance” the new buildings with township activities and expenses.

“I’m there for the public to keep our taxes down and to do the best we can with what we’ve got,” Andersen said.

The Northwest Herald was unable to contact Fuller for this story.

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