U.S. snail mail

To the Editor:

I don’t like the phrase “snail mail.” The word that started it all was email. It all seems to be the same. The snail mail takes two days to reach its destination, and then it’s read (email may reach its destination in two seconds, but may not be read in two days, if ever).

If the email is important enough to keep, it has to be printed out on your computer or your printer. So what does it save?

It’s not the money, and since we are living longer, it’s not the time. Everyone wants us to do direct deposit, so we can’t see our money. The cost of snail mail is a stamp, a piece of paper, an envelope and maybe a return address label. Email requires a computer, a tower, a screen or monitor, maybe speakers, a mouse, a keyboard, ink cartridges, good lighting, wires all over the place, either to be hidden or to pretend that they don’t exist, a desk to put it all on, and a room to put it all in.

Then, if someone gets the information faster than you do, your computer is too slow. Buy a new one.

I get all my bills and pay all my bills by snail mail, so I know what is coming in and what is going out.

The people that handle the big money in this country don’t want us to see that we are just as irresponsible with our money as they are with our money.

Fritz Von Bruenchenhein

McHenry