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Local

Nippersink watershed group gathers views on water quality

WONDER LAKE – The Nippersink Creek Watershed Association seeks to gather information about residents' knowledge and priorities when it comes to protecting water quality in the area.

A survey will be sent to watershed residents – the watershed covers 202 square miles in Illinois and Wisconsin – the week of July 29, according to a news release. It also will be available online at the association's website, www.nippersink.org.

The survey tries to gauge how watershed landowners view the importance of protecting the quality of surface and groundwater, how they view potential threats to that water quality, and whether they understand the degree to which different activities can affect water quality.

It asks residents how they would rate the quality of water for different activities; whether poor water quality issues, such as contaminated drinking or swimming water, have become a problem in their area; what types of preventive practices, such as creating a rain garden and properly disposing of pet waste, they're familiar with and have adopted; whether they fertilize their lawns; and whether they have septic systems.

The information will be used to generate a social assessment of what is important to property owners and identify what educational outreach may be needed.

The study is funded through the Clean Water Act through the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency and is done in partnership with Illinois State University and other area watershed associations.

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