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Cary approves retirement agreement with Deputy Chief Fetzer

Published: Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013 3:25 p.m. CDT • Updated: Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013 11:29 p.m. CDT

CARY – Deputy police Chief Ed Fetzer, who initially was named acting chief after Chief Steven Casstevens left for the same job in Buffalo Grove, will officially retire at the end of the calendar year.

Fetzer has been on paid leave from the department since Sept. 5, and Sgt. Mike Roth has been filling in as acting chief and will continue to do so until a new chief is selected. Village Administrator Chris Clark would not comment on why Fetzer went on leave.

Under a retirement agreement approved by the Village Board on Tuesday, the village will pay 100 percent of Fetzer’s health, vision and dental insurance premiums for 2014 and 2015. From 2016 through 2018, the village will pay for half of Fetzer’s insurance premiums.

Village Administrator Chris Clark said under current coverage costs, the village expects to pay out $65,000 for five years of Fetzer’s insurance.

However, insurance premiums may change over the years and are adjusted every July 1, Clark added.

“The board felt it was appropriate as part of the mutual retirement agreement on the schedule detailed, which means by Jan. 1, he is no longer in the position,” Clark said. Fetzer, who did not wish to comment for this story, has been with the department for 28 years. He became deputy chief in 2001.

Fetzer’s deputy chief salary of $101,712 a year will be used to calculate his pension. The agreement approved on Tuesday was tentatively approved by Fetzer, Clark said.

Clark said this is the right time for the village and the department to move forward. He said the command staff is active and motivated, including a sergeant who recently completed the FBI National Academy and a sergeant who worked on an agreement with Lexipol Knowledge Management System for updating and organizing department policies and procedures.

“It’s all part of a puzzle which at the end will result in an improved Cary Police Department for the next decade,” Clark said. “In any change you always have opportunities and, yes, they have been growing. I think we’re unleashing the talent we have now and we’re seeing people step up, raise their hand, wanting to take on new responsibilities, and that’s a healthy part of this process. We’re going to have the opportunity ... for some new promotions and that’s a good thing over the long haul for this department.” Village President Mark Kownick said Fetzer indicated he would not apply for the police chief position.

Clark said the village had 66 people apply for the job, and REM Management Services, who is conducting the search for the village, narrowed the search to 22 people to complete written exercises, Clark said.

That list was narrowed to eight people, who will be evaluated in group interactions, structured interviews, public speaking exercises and one-on-one interviews, among other things.

That group would be narrowed to four to five people, who would then meet with village trustees during the first week of December, Clark said.

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