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Cabinet trending - Sleek and simple

SPONSORED • Published: Thursday, May 29, 2014 2:34 p.m. CDT • Updated: Monday, June 2, 2014 10:25 a.m. CDT
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Gone are the decorative golden oak and maple kitchen cabinets of a generation ago.

Today’s well-appointed kitchen cabinet is sporting sleek, clean lines with a surprising dichotomy of color.

It’s been dubbed “transitional style,” a mash up of traditional and classic, with updated variations.

Envision a kitchen from 20 or 30 years ago:  there are moldings and corbels and appliques. Today’s high-end cabinets have stripped away the frills. What’s trending are classic, simple and elegant designs, like a shaker door with a flat or raised panel.

Colors have changed, too. Growing popular is a painted finish, the choice of more than 40 percent of new cabinetry on the market. And paint has become the exception to the “darker-is-better” trend, in that 90 percent of the homeowners choose paint, choose white.

That’s not to say that oak is completely passe’. It’s making a comeback, but today’s flat panel doors likely will boast a stain in darker colors, like espresso, briarwood or dark cranberry.

While homeowners are looking for a simpler, more elegant, classic look in their kitchens, the transitional style allows them to kick it up a notch by adding subtle extras like tile to the sink backsplash or a countertop with a little bit more design.

Find the choices you want and the help you need at Hines Supply in Grayslake. Hines carries Parker, Adams or Rohe doors, all popular classically simple styles produced by Mid Continent Cabinetry. Those with an independent spirit and unique tastes, however, need not fear. Hines can get a cabinet in an  color that Sherwin Williams makes.

Visit today in the Grayslake store, 939 S. Rte 83 , or at www.hinessupply.com

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